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Archive for the ‘Magic’ Category

What are the chances of reading two consecutive books with a character named Trent as a prominent character? Well, that is neither here nor there.

Mardi and Molly, sixteen year old twins, beautiful, spoiled, rich witches used to clubbing in Manhattan’s TripleMoonhot spots have been banished by their father, Troy, to the sedate little East End hamlet of North Hampton for the summer when their names become linked with the deaths of two students, Parker and Samantha, after a penthouse party. In an attempt to rein in their use of magic and to teach them ‘values’, the girls are babysitting Troy’s friend, Ingrid’s two children and are forced to get summer jobs like ‘normal’ kids. However, that’s like putting the fox in the chicken coup because they are exposed to two gorgeous guys who happen to be warlocks.

As the summer progresses, things get worse instead of better. The White Council of witches is seeking to censure (or worse) the two teens because of their visible use of magic which will cause attention by mortals to the existence of witches. The use of magic has been curtailed for the past ten years when mortals became suspicious of witches’ existence. In addition, there are witnesses who have come forward to say that Mardi and Molly actually pushed Parker and Sam in front of the oncoming number 6 subway train and therefore criminal charges are being contemplated against the twins. The problem is the twins have only vague memories of that night’s happenings.

However, getting their memories back and finding out who killed Parker and Sam takes a back seat in Triple Moon behind the girls hooking up, borrowing expensive stylish clothes, hooking up, drinking expensive wines, eating caviar, being jealous and secretive with each other and did I mention hooking up. Mardi races up and down North Hampton in her vintage red 1972 Ferrari. Molly rides Ingrid’s bike in stylish espadrilles or designer heels.

Ingrid and her sister Fryda, also witches, understand the seriousness of the matter and have even called in help from New Orleans in the form of Jean-Baptiste Mesomier, who specializes in regaining memory. However, the twins still remember little and do not take it seriously.

I do remember reading one of Melissa de la Cruz’s early books and liking it, however I don’t remember which one. Quite honestly, if I didn’t have to read Triple Moon for a journal review, I wouldn’t have read past page 2. I found the book truly mind-numbing and while I’m all for getting kids to read anything as long as they read, I would put Triple Moon at the bottom of the wish list. Not even the chapter names which are song titles (many of which her audience would not know) make this book palatable.

Mardi and Molly could care less about others, only thinking of themselves. Mardi drives a vintage Ferrari. Molly has a closet full of clothes. The boys in the story are gorgeous, blue-eyed, ribbed and rich…of course, rich. The girls think nothing of ‘hooking up’ and ‘removing clothing’, reneging on promises to babysit so that they can be with boys, drinking, etc. And while I don’t think every book has to have a moral, Molly and Mardi are no role models and surely project the wrong image for teens. If this isn’t offputting enough, it almost appears that Ms. de la Cruz got tired of reading her book because it hastily draws to a close with an improbable ending, even for a book about witches.

While I realize that Ms. de la Cruz is a prominent YA author and teens love to read her books, I could not in good conscience recommend Triple Moon to any reader.

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VeryNearlyHonorableAhoy mateys!!!! Guess what today is!!! The release date of the Terror of the Soutlands.

If yer not reading the Terror of the Southlands, then yer gonna get thrown out of the Very Nearly Honorable League of Pirates. This is yer first warnin’.

Hilary Westfield, the Terror of the Southlands herself, hasn’t raised her sword for months and if she doesn’t do something daring like slay a sea monster or defeat a rebel pirate, she is in danger of being tossed from the VNHLP. But when she hears that Eugenie Pimm, the Enchantress has disappeared, she decides to find her, because a pirate must always help a mate. Along with her first mate, Pirate Charlie Dove and her faithful gargoyle, she makes her way to Miss Pimm’s Finishing School for Delicate Ladies, to find Miss Pimm gone. But she meets up with her old friend, Claire, who wants to help find the Enchantress and go on an adventure. So off they go, on a rousing sea-faring adventure, the likes of which should put Captain Blacktooth, the very president of this here VNHLP right about The Terror. But, nay, ’cause he’s against this adventure and skullduggery.

But The Terror won’t be bullied because a pirate must NOT forget to be fearsome. Thar’s cannonball blasts and sword fights and rope tying and rescuing in this yarn. Thar’s pirating and disguising and magic. Thar’s grog drinkin’ and mast climbing and skullduggery galore.

So, if’n yar goin’ to be a right proper pirate, then it’s the Terror of the Southlands that should be on the night stand in yer cabin. Don’t make me give you a second warnin’. Us pirate types are short on patience and my sword hand is itchin’.

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InvisibilityStephen is invisible to everyone, the result of a curse placed by his maternal grandfather on his mother. He’s been living this way for all of his 16 years and has come to grips with the lifestyle. That is until one day when a new neighbor moves into his apartment building, two doors down. Elizabeth, struggling to unlock her door and not lose her packages fails at the task, dropping them on the floor. Turning to Stephen, she snarkily says something to the effect of “having fun watching me? how about helping?” Stunned, Stephen assists her, which sets off a romance and a quest.

The quest is “why can Elizabeth see him when no one else can?” The romance…oh, you can figure that out yourself. I’ve never read anything written by Andrea Cremer. David Levithan, however, has broken many literary barriers with his YA novels. Boy Meets Boy certainly is ground-breaking. Every Day posits the supposition that a person can wake up in another person’s body on a daily basis and live that person’s life as well as his/her own. Quite a fun read. And now, he and Ms. Cremer have introduced us to magic, spellcasters, cursecasters and spellseekers in Invisibility. (By not explaining these, I’m forcing you to read the book…which is my intention.)

The authors take you on an adventure with all the necessary ingredients: spells, death defying feats, etc. I was going to put the book down with 50 pages left, at 11:15 PM one night, but decided wisely to stay up until I finished it.

For those of you who identify with the loners of the world, there’s Stephen and Elizabeth. For those of you who identify with the “can-do, nothing can stop me” characters, there’s Elizabeth’s brother, Laurie, who’s had to overcome his own major trials. For those of you who want a character to hate, well, there’s one of those too…and plenty of characters to love.  For those of you who just want something fun to read, there’s Invisibility, which, trust me, will not be invisible in your library or bookstore. Actually, I’m thinking this book is going to fly off the shelves, so it may be invisible for a bit. So, maybe you just need your own copy. Whichever way you go, just make sure you read it.

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